motorcycle reconstruction expert

Applying Automotive EDR Data to Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction

Applying Automotive EDR Data to Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction

I just made a proposal to SAE for a new course titled “Applying Automotive EDR Data to Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction.” Here are some of the specifics, which I would love your thoughts on. What would improve this concept? What would make this course more useful. I’ll be offering this course for the first time on November 6, 2019 in Denver, along with Alan Moore’s class “Accident Reconstruction, the Automomous Vehicle and ADAS” (November 5) and Neal Carter’s new class on using drones for mapping accident sites (November 7). Hold these dates if you are interested…more info to come.

Braking and Swerving Capabilities of Three-Wheeled Motorcycles

With the three-wheeled motorcycles in this study, the average decelerations for the tests that utilized both the front and rear brakes varied between 0.74 and 0.91 g. This range is situated in the upper half of the corresponding range for two-wheeled motorcycles (0.54 to 0.96 g). This is consistent with the fact that two-wheeled motorcycles require more skill for braking since there is more of a risk of capsizing if the rider locks up a wheel, particularly the front. For the three-wheeled motorcycles, less skill is required since the risk of capsizing is minimal, and the rider can lock up the wheels.

Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction: Lane-Splitting, Lane-Sharing, and Filtering in California

Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction: Lane-Splitting, Lane-Sharing, and Filtering in California

Lane-sharing is the practice by a motorcyclist of sharing a lane with another vehicle. Lane-splitting is the practice by a motorcyclist of riding between streams of traffic by riding on or near the striping between lanes. Filtering, which seems to be a term frequently used outside of the United States, is the practice by a motorcyclist of riding between lines of stopped or nearly stopped traffic at a traffic signal. The terms lane-splitting and lane-sharing are often used interchangeably and often the term lane-sharing is used as a catch-all term for all of these practices. These practices, which are allowed in California, allow a motorcyclist to drive faster than the surrounding traffic in congested or stop-and-go traffic [1, 2]. They also give motorcyclists more options for how they position themselves on the roadway, allowing them to “strategically place themselves in pockets of lower congestion during commute traffic” and to “distance themselves from safety hazards from larger vehicles beside or behind them, or from hazards presented by highly congested clusters of traffic” [2].

Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction: Applicable Error Rates for Struck Vehicle EDR-Reported Delta-V

Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction: Applicable Error Rates for Struck Vehicle EDR-Reported Delta-V

I’m in the midst of preparing 2 articles and a presentation for the upcoming EDR Summit in Houston (March 4-6, 2019). My topic is the use of struck vehicle EDR-data when reconstruction motorcycle-versus-passenger vehcile collisions. I thought I would put a teaser on the topic out into the world and also, hopefully, pass along some useful information. I’d love your thoughts on this topic. Read this post and then reach out to me at nrose@kineticorp.com or leave comments on the post. Thanks and I’ll see you in Houston!

Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction - Incorporating Struck Vehicle EDR Data

Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction - Incorporating Struck Vehicle EDR Data

This article describes the reconstruction of an intersection collision involving a motorcycle. EDR data from the sport utility vehicle that was struck by the motorcycle is incorporated into the reconstruction. This collision involved a motorcyclist riding a 2007 Harley-Davidson FLSTFI Fat Boy eastbound through the subject intersection. The driver of a westbound 2010 Ford Edge attempted to turn left to go southbound and the motorcycle struck the passenger’s side rear of the Ford. The driver of the Ford stated that she did not see the motorcycle prior to initiating her turn on a yellow traffic signal. A witness who observed the motorcycle prior to the collision stated that the motorcyclist accelerated into the intersection to make it through on the yellow light. The speed limit for east-west traffic through the intersection was 60 mph. An investigating officer noted that sun glare could have been a factor contributing to the Ford driver not seeing the motorcyclist.

Why Do Drivers Pull Out in Front of Motorcyclists? (Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction)

Why Do Drivers Pull Out in Front of Motorcyclists? (Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction)

In 1977, Hurt noted that “the most likely comment of an automobile driver involved in a traffic collision with a motorcycle is that he, or she, did not SEE the motorcycle…” Hurt continued: “The origin of this problem seems to be related to the element of conspicuity (or conspicuousness) of the motorcycle; in other words, how easy it is to see the motorcycle. When the motorcycle and the automobile are on collision paths, or when the vehicles are in opposing traffic, the conspicuity due to motion is very low, if it exists at all. Consequently, recognition of the motorcycle by the automobile driver will depend entirely upon the conspicuity due to contrast. If the approaching motorcycle and rider blend well with the background scene, and if the automobile driver has not developed improved visual search habits which include low-threat targets…the motorcycle will not be recognized as a vehicle and a traffic hazard exists” (emphasis added). But there is more to the story than that.

Determining Motorcycle Speed from the Struck Vehicle Translation and Rotation (Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction)

Determining Motorcycle Speed from the Struck Vehicle Translation and Rotation (Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction)

One indicator of a motorcycle’s impact speed with a passenger vehicle is the magnitude of the translation and rotation experienced by the passenger vehicle following the impact. Simulation can be an effective means to determine the motorcycle speed necessary to cause a specific magnitude of translation and rotation of the passenger vehicle. Deyerl and Cheng [2007, 2008] illustrated this type of analysis using EDSMAC4 simulation. Another software package that can be used to carry out such simulations is PC-Crash, a vehicular crash simulation software that is widely used by the reconstruction community. Numerous studies conducted over the last two decades have demonstrated that the impact and trajectory models of PC-Crash can accurately model vehicular crashes [Rose, 2018].

Sliding and Tumbling Deceleration of a Motorcycle (Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction)

Sliding and Tumbling Deceleration of a Motorcycle (Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction)

A quick aside...this is a draft of another section from the motorcycle accident reconstruction book that I'm writing with Lou Peck and William Neale. Lou, in particular, assisted with this section. Let me know what suggestions you have for making this more readable and useful. Thanks!

Braking Capabilities of Motorcyclists - A Literature Review

Braking Capabilities of Motorcyclists - A Literature Review

Hey everybody. This is my first attempt at a summary of the literature on the braking capabilities of motorcyclists, one small section for the motorcycle accident reconstruction book I'm working on with Lou Peck and William Neale. I would love to hear your comments on this - what is it missing? what do you like and not like?

Producing Forensic Animations that are Credible and Admissible (Motorcycle Crash Example)

Producing Forensic Animations that are Credible and Admissible (Motorcycle Crash Example)

An animation can provide tremendous value to a jury by making an expert’s opinions more understandable. In this article, I will give you 7 principles for producing credible and admissible animations for use in depositions, mediations, settlement conferences, and trials.