motorcycle reconstruction

Applying Automotive EDR Data to Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction

Applying Automotive EDR Data to Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction

I just made a proposal to SAE for a new course titled “Applying Automotive EDR Data to Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction.” Here are some of the specifics, which I would love your thoughts on. What would improve this concept? What would make this course more useful. I’ll be offering this course for the first time on November 6, 2019 in Denver, along with Alan Moore’s class “Accident Reconstruction, the Automomous Vehicle and ADAS” (November 5) and Neal Carter’s new class on using drones for mapping accident sites (November 7). Hold these dates if you are interested…more info to come.

Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction: Lane-Splitting, Lane-Sharing, and Filtering in California

Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction: Lane-Splitting, Lane-Sharing, and Filtering in California

Lane-sharing is the practice by a motorcyclist of sharing a lane with another vehicle. Lane-splitting is the practice by a motorcyclist of riding between streams of traffic by riding on or near the striping between lanes. Filtering, which seems to be a term frequently used outside of the United States, is the practice by a motorcyclist of riding between lines of stopped or nearly stopped traffic at a traffic signal. The terms lane-splitting and lane-sharing are often used interchangeably and often the term lane-sharing is used as a catch-all term for all of these practices. These practices, which are allowed in California, allow a motorcyclist to drive faster than the surrounding traffic in congested or stop-and-go traffic [1, 2]. They also give motorcyclists more options for how they position themselves on the roadway, allowing them to “strategically place themselves in pockets of lower congestion during commute traffic” and to “distance themselves from safety hazards from larger vehicles beside or behind them, or from hazards presented by highly congested clusters of traffic” [2].

Determining Motorcycle Speed from the Struck Vehicle Translation and Rotation (Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction)

Determining Motorcycle Speed from the Struck Vehicle Translation and Rotation (Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction)

One indicator of a motorcycle’s impact speed with a passenger vehicle is the magnitude of the translation and rotation experienced by the passenger vehicle following the impact. Simulation can be an effective means to determine the motorcycle speed necessary to cause a specific magnitude of translation and rotation of the passenger vehicle. Deyerl and Cheng [2007, 2008] illustrated this type of analysis using EDSMAC4 simulation. Another software package that can be used to carry out such simulations is PC-Crash, a vehicular crash simulation software that is widely used by the reconstruction community. Numerous studies conducted over the last two decades have demonstrated that the impact and trajectory models of PC-Crash can accurately model vehicular crashes [Rose, 2018].

Equations for Estimating the Center of Gravity Height of a Motorcycle (Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction)

Equations for Estimating the Center of Gravity Height of a Motorcycle (Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction)

At times, an estimate of the center of gravity height of a motorcycle may be needed. For example, for a motorcycle crash that occurs on a curve, the center of gravity height may come into the calculation of the lean angle required for the motorcycle to follow a specific path through a curve. This analysis may play a role in determining why the motorcyclist crashed [Rose, 2014]. Cossalter [2006] presented equations for calculating the required lean angle of a motorcycle for a particular curve that take into account the width of the motorcycle tires. Carter [2015] and Rose [2018] validated Cossalter’s equations. These equations utilize an estimate of the combined center of gravity height of the motorcycle and rider, an estimate that will first require an estimate of the center of gravity height of the motorcycle without the rider. Foale [2006] has presented a method for calculating a combined motorcycle/rider center of gravity height once the center of gravity height of the motorcycle is known.

Sliding and Tumbling Deceleration of a Motorcycle (Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction)

Sliding and Tumbling Deceleration of a Motorcycle (Motorcycle Accident Reconstruction)

A quick aside...this is a draft of another section from the motorcycle accident reconstruction book that I'm writing with Lou Peck and William Neale. Lou, in particular, assisted with this section. Let me know what suggestions you have for making this more readable and useful. Thanks!

Braking Capabilities of Motorcyclists - A Literature Review

Braking Capabilities of Motorcyclists - A Literature Review

Hey everybody. This is my first attempt at a summary of the literature on the braking capabilities of motorcyclists, one small section for the motorcycle accident reconstruction book I'm working on with Lou Peck and William Neale. I would love to hear your comments on this - what is it missing? what do you like and not like?

How YouTube is Advancing the Science of Accident Reconstruction

How YouTube is Advancing the Science of Accident Reconstruction

YouTube is a treasure trove of real-world crash data that is advancing the science of accident reconstruction. Take the videos posted by Ken Snyder (aka RNickeymouse), for instance. On the weekends, you may find Snyder among those perched at Edwards Corner with a camera. This 180-degree curve is the final curve on a section of the Mulholland Highway motorcyclists often call the Snake (the photograph below shows this curve).